A GROUP PHOTOGRAPH - BEFORE, NOW, AND IN-BETWEEN
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LIST OF OFFICERS

The names of the fifty men at the heart of my research are shown below (along with surnames that are related to their families). If any of these names ring any bells with you, please contact me - I'm always on the look-out for connections. Click on any of their names to see some brief details about each of them (I'm keeping most of the details so that there's something left to put in the book!):

Thomas Edward  ALLEN  | James  BARROW  | Charles Frederick Napier  BARTLETT  |
Leslie Herman  BERLEIN  | William Howe  BISSLEY  | Geoffrey Heslop  BLACK  |
Ronald William  BRAKSPEAR  | Brian Dudley  BRIGG  | Hugh Kennedy  CASSELS  |
Wilfrid Lawson  CLARKE  | Cecil Stedman  CLOAKE  | Harold  COHEN  |
George Bertrand  COOTE  | Richard Markham  COOTE  | Alfred Percival  DOBSON  |
Lionel Huddlestone  EDWARDS  | Douglas Eric  FOOT  | Frederic Clifford  GARDENNER  | |  Cyril  GENTRY-BIRCH  | David Corse  GLEN  | Douglas Murray  HANNA  |
William Gray  HAYNES  | George Henry  HEWITT  | Basil Perrin  HICKS  |
William George  HOBBS  | William Franklin George  JOSEPH  |
Harold Charles Linford  KEABLE  | Louis Arthur  KLEMANTASKI  |
Thomas Bernard  LAWRENCE  | Gordon Fraser  MARSH  | Peter  McGIBBON  |
Wilfred Southey Deare  OLDMAN  | Charles Gordon  PARAMORE  |
Thomas Gordon  PEACOCK  | Richard Stephen&nbspPierrepont  POYNTZ  |
Mervyn Phippen  PUGH  | Thomas Gerald  ROBINSON  | Aubyn Redmond  ROUSE  |
Clifford  SALMAN  | Cyril  SPARTALI  | Donald Fenwick  STILEMAN  |
Frank Mariner  SUMPSTER  | Edward Sidney Beaumont  TAVENER  |
Morice Bell  THOMPSON  | Henry Cyril  THORNE  | Douglas  TOSETTI  |
William Crawford  WALTON  | Charles Randolph  WATSON  |
Cyril Arthur  WILLIAMSON  | Harold Vivian  WOODFORD  |



Thomas Edward ALLEN

Originally from Ireland, he managed to survive the War, despite bullet wounds in his right biceps, right chest, and left thigh, a bayonet wound in the right side of his abdomen, and chlorine gas inhalation - all on the first day of the Battle of Loos.

Related surnames: Hanbidge, Mitchell, Synge, Morawetz, Seddon

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/thomas-edward-allen/

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James BARROW

Originally from Culcheth in Lancashire, he was one of the oldest in the photograph, having had a full career in the ranks (including service in the Boer War). He was the battalion's Quartermaster, and served in France until his death on 1st June 1916. He left a wife and five children.

Related surnames: Cleworth, Townley, Simpson, Ribton, Johnson, Jackson

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/james-barrow/

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Charles Frederick Napier BARTLETT

He was second-in-command of the 8th Royal Berkshires when they went out to France in 1915, fought at Loos and the Somme, and was interim Commanding Officer at various times. At the end of the War he was working at the Ministry of National Service, and retired with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel.

Related surnames: Robinson, McNair, Fraser, Barran, Napier, Kirkland, Saunders

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/charles-frederick-napier-bartlett/

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Leslie Herman BERLEIN

Born in Johannesburg, South Africa, he was a law student at Cambridge when war broke out. When my grandmother visited the battalion during her school holidays in the summer of 1915, he gave her a ride in his sidecar. He was a very popular officer, but sadly was killed on the first day at Loos.

Related surnames: Woods, Gustorf

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/leslie-herman-berlein/

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William Howe BISSLEY

Was on the point of sitting his final examinations for a Geography degree, when war broke out. He was killed on the Somme in August 1916, only four days before his daughter was born. One of his great-granddaughters got married in June 1998.

Related surnames: Beaumont, Brown, Leftley, Lawrence, Howe

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/william-howe-bissley/

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Geoffrey Heslop BLACK

Seems to have had a life with no fixed roots (both during and after the War) - almost every piece of information I have about him comes from a different address, or refers to a different employment or posting. He survived the War, having served with the 8th, 9th, and 5th Royal Berkshires, the Cheshires, and the Machine Gun Corps (and having been shot in the neck in March 1916).

Related surnames: Brennan, Hickes, Roberts, Heslop, Wright

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/geoffrey-heslop-black/

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Ronald William BRAKSPEAR

Was a company director of Brakspear's brewery in Henley. Soon after the battalion went into the trenches, he made use of his Henley Rifle Club skills by shooting a German sniper. He was grievously wounded on the first day of Loos, and died only a matter of minutes after his mother and brother arrived to visit him in hospital in Etaples. The brewery is still going strong.

Related surnames: Perry, Pike, Phillips, Young, Hayward

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/ronald-william-brakspear/

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Brian Dudley BRIGG

Served with the Berkshires throughout the Great War. In civilian life, he was a solicitor and was married with two children. He also served in the Second World War, having an emergency commission with the Royal Army Service Corps. Having survived both wars, he died in 1947 aged only 55.

Related surnames: Eyles, Haigh, Field, Hinchliffe

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/brian-dudley-brigg/

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Hugh Kennedy CASSELS

His father came from Oporto in Portugal but emigrated to South America. Hugh was born in Buenos Aires, one of eleven children. He was a battalion machine-gun officer, and was killed on the first day at Loos.

Related surnames: Dashwood, Gannon, Harris, Trillia, Cox, Chance, Jones/Johnes, Simons, Manning

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/hugh-kennedy-cassels/

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Wilfrid Lawson CLARKE

From very humble beginnings, he rose to be an assistant master at Sonning Boys School. He served in the trenches with the Berkshires, but towards the end of the War he became an Educational Instructor. He then had a full career with the Army Education Corps (including being headmaster at Queen Victoria School, Dunblane) and retired as a Lieutenant Colonel, living in Knowle Close, Caversham, Berkshire.

Related surnames: Hodder

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/wilfrid-lawson-clarke/

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Cecil Stedman CLOAKE

Was studying medicine in London when war broke out. Served with the 8th Royal Berkshires, being Adjutant from September 1915 to January 1918 (earning the Military Cross on the Somme). He then responded to a call for a medical students to return to their studies, due to a potential shortage of doctors. After the War, he went on to become a much-loved and respected GP in Wimbledon.

Related surnames: Newling, Saunders, Woollard, Maplesden, Ball, Powter

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/cecil-stedman-cloake/

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Harold COHEN

Was the first casualty from the photograph - he fell ill, possibly connected to having had appendicitis a few years before, and died of blood-poisoning and double pneumonia in July 1915, aged only 19. He is buried in Golders Green Jewish Cemetery. His father Percy was President of the Reading Hebrew Congregation at Reading Synagogue.


Related surnames: Broadbridge, Weiller, Newnham, Marlow, Turner

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/harold-cohen/

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George Bertrand COOTE

Was the youngest of four brothers (including Richard Markham COOTE ). Served in France with the 8th Royal Berkshires, before transferring to the Machine Gun Corps. He was wounded in July 1917 when he was buried by a collapsing wall after it had been hit by a shell. He was killed in May 1918 during the German offensive near Soissons.

Related surnames: Kruger, Sheppard, Markham, Lewis

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/george-bertrand-coote/

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Richard Markham COOTE

(Not actually in the photograph, but listed as absent when the photograph was taken.)
Was the second of four brothers (including George Bertrand COOTE ). Before the war, he was a barrister-at-law in Lincoln's Inn. At 6' 3" tall, he must have towered over most of the men in the battalion. He was killed on 13th October 1915 during the battalion's second attack at Loos.

Related surnames: Kruger, Sheppard, Markham, Lewis

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Alfred Percival DOBSON

Unusual amongst the officers in the photograph, in that he came from the Newcastle area. He served in France with the 1st Royal Berkshires and the Machine Gun Corps, and was awarded the Military Cross in 1917. Not only survived active service through the nearly the whole of the First World War, but also the entire Second World War with the Pioneer Corps - even managing to save himself from the sinking of the Lancastria (Britain's biggest ever maritime disaster as the result of German bombing as thousands were being evacuated from St Nazaire on 17th June 1940 - more lives were lost than in the Titanic and Lusitania disasters combined - but it is not well known because Churchill ordered the news to be kept out of the papers at the time in the interests of morale).

Related surnames: Hall, Boden, Hayles, Browne

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/alfred-percival-dobson/

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Lionel Huddlestone EDWARDS

Was an advertising agent like his father. He was badly wounded during the battalion's second attack at Loos. The resulting gangrene led to the necessity for a severe operation, after which he was declared permanently unfit for general service. He did however serve on the staff in Egypt. After the War, he returned to advertising and married late in life. He was buried at South Mimms church.

Related surnames: Rabnett, Robbins, Huddlestone, Hall, Wrenn

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/lionel-huddlestone-edwards/

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Douglas Eric FOOT

The youngest of those pictured in the photograph, he was only 18 when he was killed on 13th October 1915 (only 8 days after he had joined the battalion in France). His brother served in the RFC and RAF (reaching the rank of Major and earning the Military Cross), and, although the Germans did not manage to hurt him, he was injured in a motor accident and a flying accident, and finally killed in a further flying accident in 1923.

Related surnames: Bray, Fraser, Hauang, Cooper, Cocker

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/douglas-eric-foot/

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Frederic Clifford GARDENNER

Was a dental student at the outbreak of the war. He went out to France in October 1915, and was very badly wounded by a shell in March 1916. This forced him to relinquish his commission, but he later recovered enough to go into practice as a dentist, and was a very active member of his local community. There was a big turn-out for his funeral after he died from cancer aged only 44.

Related surnames: Cave, Thomas, Crocker

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/frederic-clifford-gardenner/

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Cyril GENTRY-BIRCH

(Not actually in the photograph, but listed as absent when the photograph was taken.)
Was a key member of the 8th Royal Berkshires, winning the Military Cross at Loos, and fighting on the Somme and at Passchendaele. He became a prisoner-of-war during the German Spring Offensive of 1918. In 1936, he re-joined the Army as a Major in the Cheshires, and eventually retired after the Second World War as a Colonel. In retirement he lived in Chalkhouse Green and Caversham in Berkshire and had connections with Pangbourne & District Rifle Club. At the time of his death he was a resident of an old people's home in Finchampstead, Berkshire.

Related surnames: Girdler, Pickering

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David Corse GLEN

Born in Scotland, he had completed an Engineering Diploma in London just before the outbreak of the War. He was killed on the first day of the Battle of Loos, aged 21.

Related surnames: Virtue, Newton, Brockbank, King-Smith

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/david-corse-glen/

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Douglas Murray HANNA

Before the War, he was a partner of Messrs Gow, Somerville & Co., a tea company in Ceylon. He was also quite an athlete, and was a member of the Colombo Town Guard before returning to England at the beginning of 1915. He was killed on the first day at Loos.

Related surnames: Hull, Murray, Greenshields, Baxter

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/douglas-murray-hanna/

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William Gray HAYNES

(Not actually in the photograph, but listed as absent when the photograph was taken.)
Was an athlete of some distinction in his time at Reading School, setting a record for the mile race that remained unbeaten for several years. He also played for the Berkshire Wanderers rugby club and Berkshire Hockey Club. In between school and the war, he worked in his father's ironmongery shop. He was killed on the first day at Loos.

Related surnames: Almond, Biss, Cook, Gray, Gude, Smith, Thomas

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George Henry HEWITT

Was Chaplain with the 8th Royal Berkshires only briefly - after going to France, he became Divisional Chaplain of 26th Division. He survived the war, despite an attack of malarial influenza when in Salonika. He was vicar of Cobridge, and of Pirton near Hitchin. His son was a Chaplain to the Queen from 1969 to 1982.

Related surnames: Cammack, Baines, Caparn

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/george-henry-hewitt/

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Basil Perrin HICKS

Studied Modern Languages at Cambridge, and was fluent in French and German. He was killed on the first day at Loos. His father was Professor of Physics at Sheffield University, and created a memorial to his son in the form of the Basil Hicks Lectureship Fund that is still in existence today.

Related surnames: Blincoe, Gripenberg, Rolston, Thesiger, Perrin, Story, Mitchinson

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/basil-perrin-hicks/

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William George HOBBS

The son of the chief clerk of West London Police Court, he went on to become a solicitor. He was a keen lacrosse player, and went out on a tour to Sweden in before the War. He was amongst those killed on the first day at Loos.

Related surnames: Archer, Ball, Stevenson, Tyler

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/william-george-hobbs/

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William Franklin George JOSEPH

Was a solicitor in London. During the War, he served with the 8th, 9th, 3rd, 6th, and 2nd Royal Berkshires. He had a major period of illness in 1916, but survived until May 1918 when he was killed during the German offensive near Soissons.

Related surnames: Cohen, Dennis, Franklin, Hemming, Sanderson, Waley, Selig

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/william-franklin-george-joseph/

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Harold Charles Linford KEABLE

Was the son of the Vicar of Wrecclesham. He studied agriculture and then went out to work in Egypt for a couple of years before the War. He was killed on the first day at Loos. I have got a picture of the two dogs he left to his father in his will.

Related surnames: Forbes, Linford, Pinniger

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/harold-charles-linford-keable/

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Louis Arthur KLEMANTASKI

Was a gifted literary man, particularly specialising in musical criticism (he founded and edited his own musical quarterly 'Euterpe' when he was only 18). He was killed in May 1916 during a German night raid. During my recent research, I have discovered his poetry notebook - there are a few snippets of his own composition, but it mostly contains his favourite poems by other authors. I have met his first cousin, Louis Klemantaski (the photographer).

Related surnames: Jaffa, Gallagher, Monro, Phillips, Powell, Taylor, Woodward, Bosman

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/louis-arthur-klemantaski/

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Thomas Bernard LAWRENCE

Was born in Burma, but returned to England when his father retired from the Indian Transport Corps. Won the Military Cross at Loos, having taken over the command of the battalion on the first night despite being only 20 years old. He survived the war, after a career in India (including service in the Second World War), he died in Cornwall and is buried in Perranzabuloe.

Related surnames: Carkeek, Hooper, Lynch, Downey

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/thomas-bernard-lawrence/

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Gordon Fraser MARSH

Was wounded both at Loos and on the Somme, and was awarded the Military Cross in 1917. Survived the War and emigrated to Kenya. During the Second World War, he served as an adjutant in the prisoner-of-war camps out there.

Related surnames: Fraser, Toms, Richmond

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/gordon-fraser-marsh/

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Peter McGIBBON

(Not actually in the photograph, but was with the battalion at Loos.)
Born in Canada, he originally qualified as a doctor there before he came to England to continue his studies. He was the 8th Royal Berkshire's Medical Officer, and was awarded the Military Cross for his work at the Battle of Loos. He survived the war and became an MP for Muskoka Riding in Canada, in addition to being the owner of the Muskoka Herald Publishing Co, President of the Bracebridge Board of Trade, Honorary President of the Ontario Lacrosse League, and a member of the Albany Club.

Related surnames: Boyd, Brown

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Wilfred Southey Deare OLDMAN

Served with the Ceylon Mounted Infantry and the South African Constabulary during the Boer War, and was a rancher in South Africa when war broke out. He was killed on the first day at Loos. His brother, Richard Deare Furley Oldman, became a Major-General.

Related surnames: Deare, Randell, Ready, Upfill, Furley

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/wilfred-southey-deare-oldman/

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Charles Gordon PARAMORE

Was an artist. He was killed on the first day of Loos, and his name is on the memorial at the entrance to the Royal Academy in London. He is mentioned in the diaries of his cousin Mrs Josiah (Florence Elizabeth) Lockwood, a well-known suffragist, pacifist, Liberal, Quaker, and artist.

Related surnames: Clay, Hick, Lockwood, Smith, Williams, Allanson, Beall

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/charles-gordon-paramore/

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Thomas Gordon PEACOCK

Despite only being 21, he was appointed Adjutant of the 8th Royal Berkshires. He was killed on the first day of Loos, and has no known grave. On the 82nd anniversary of the battle, a cold autumnal day, I saw a Peacock butterfly at the Loos Memorial to the Missing. His family's business was the leading provisions merchant, Nurdin & Peacock.

Related surnames: Atkins, East, Nurdin, Ure, Wrench, Clubb

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/thomas-gordon-peacock/

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Richard Stephen Pierrepont POYNTZ

Before the War, he was a political speaker for the National Service League and the Anti-Suffrage League, among others. He went out to the trenches in October 1915. In 1917 he moved into training and became Chief Instructor at a School of Instruction. After the war he became a schoolmaster.

[ 'The Poyntz Family in India' is being researched by Ian Poyntz]

Related names: Alban, Bull, Castleton, Newdigate, Rahere, Romola, Minor, Brinn, Pierrepont

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/richard-stephen-pierrepont-poyntz/

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Mervyn Phippen PUGH

Despite having no previous military experience, he had a very distinguished war record with the 1st Royal Berkshires - reaching the rank of acting Major, and taking over command of the battalion on several occasions. He survived the war, having been awarded the Distinguished Service Order and the Military Cross, and went on to become Agent for the Director of Public Prosecutions in Birmingham.

Related surnames: Cullwick, Baylis, Phippen, Lane, Richards

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/mervyn-phippen-pugh/

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Thomas Gerald ROBINSON

Served throughout the War, being awarded the Military Cross in 1917, and in the latter part of the War was working in the Intelligence Corps. On completion of his service he returned to his occupation as a silk merchant.

Related surnames: Alcock, Ashmore, Bullock, Cavendish, Curtis, Ewart, Galloway, Parshall

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/thomas-gerald-robinson/

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Aubyn Redmond ROUSE

Went to school at Eton, and was a deputy underwriter at Lloyds at the outbreak of the war. He was badly wounded on the first day at Loos. After his recovery, he joined the Royal Flying Corps as an Equipment Officer. He returned to Lloyds after the War. His grave is among 260,000 others at Brookwood Cemetery.

Related surnames: Clarke, Stiff, Saunders, Spooner, Bishop

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/aubyn-redmond-rouse/

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Clifford SALMAN

The son of a draper in Reading, he attended Mirfield Theological College with a view to taking Holy Orders. He joined the battalion in the trenches on 5th October 1915, and only eight days later he was killed in action during the battalion's second attack at Loos.

Related surnames: Clifford, de Gols, Fox, Birch

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/clifford-salman/

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Cyril SPARTALI

Was one of twins, amongst a total of four children. Before the War, he was in business in India, but was invalided back to England with typhoid fever just as war was breaking out. He was killed on 13th October 1915, during the battalion's second attack at Loos.

Related surnames: Binckes, Ellice-Clark, Florance, Ionides, Ralli, Varsami, Mavrogordato

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/cyril-spartali/

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Donald Fenwick STILEMAN

Was the son of the first Bishop in Persia. He was badly wounded on the first day at Loos, and then again on the Somme. This latter wound left him with a dud right hand, but despite that, he had a full career in the Forestry Commission. He was the longest-surviving member of the photograph, and his descendants have numbered 4 children, 8 grandchildren, and 8 great-grandchildren.

Related surnames: Fenwick, Gibbard, Hodgson, Dale, Kenwrick-Cox, Nettleton

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/donald-fenwick-stileman/

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Frank Mariner SUMPSTER

Was the son of a Railway Station Master. He first went to France in October 1915. He was wounded at least once during the period up until March 1918. He was killed during the German Spring Offensive of 1918. He left a wife and young daughter.

Related surnames: Mitchell, Bradshaw, Goodwin, Gillman, Cranham, Green

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/frank-mariner-sumpster/

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Edward Sidney Beaumont TAVENER

Served in France with the 5th Royal Berkshires. He was invalided home after catching dysentery after eating from a tin of McConachie meat ration that was not at peak freshness. He then served as a balloon officer in the Royal Flying Corps. After the war, he worked for the Indian Forest Service.

Related surnames: Beaumont, Campbell-White, Duffield, Harrison, Francis, Brown

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/edward-sidney-beaumont-tavener/

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Morice Bell THOMPSON

Had a very successful education at both school and university, excelling at both sport and academic work. After service in the Royal Berkshires and the Shropshire Light Infantry, he joined the Machine Gun Corps, and was killed during the Battle of Arras in May 1917. His brother, Treffry Owen Thompson, went on to be Colonel Commandant of the Royal Army Medical Corps.

Related surnames: Bell, Winckworth, Smith

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/morice-bell-thompson/

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Henry Cyril THORNE

Grew up in Reading, but initially served in the ranks with the Hampshire Regiment. He got married in December 1914, not long before he was commissioned in the Royal Berkshire Regiment. He joined the 1st Battalion in France, and was killed in June 1916 during a raid on the German trenches.

Related surnames: Baple, Cox, Hopkins, Kelly, Meads, Philp

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/henry-cyril-thorne/

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Douglas TOSETTI

Before the War, he was a champagne merchant. One of the stalwarts of the 8th Royal Berkshires, he fought at Loos (where he was wounded, but continued to lead his men - thus earning the Military Cross), and the Somme, and at Passchendaele. He was second-in-command of the battalion when he was killed during the German Spring Offensive of March 1918.

Related surnames: Whytock, Newman, Folkes/Folks, Turner, Kiefer

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/douglas-tosetti/

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William Crawford WALTON

Was Commanding Officer of the 8th Royal Berkshires, having had a full career in the Indian Army (being Commanding Officer of 104th Wellesley's Rifles from 1908 to 1914). He was the uncle of Charles Randolph WATSON . Three days into the Battle of Loos, he was posted to Aden, and became General Officer Commanding the Aden Infantry Brigade. He survived the war, and his descendants have numbered 4 children, 7 grandchildren, 10 great-grandchildren, and 15 great-great-grandchildren.

Related surnames: Dalzell, Dalzell-Walton, Lee, Tatham-Warter, Davison, Athill, Hamond

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/william-crawford-walton/

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Charles Randolph WATSON

Was the nephew of the Commanding Officer, William Crawford WALTON . He was brought up in England, but at the outbreak of the War, he was working as an accountant in Canada. He went to France with the 8th Royal Berkshires, but was invalided out suffering from a disease of the foot, and returned to Canada. He was one of my grandmother's 31 first cousins.

Related surnames: Collins, Walton, Dalzell, Stedman

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/charles-randolph-watson/

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Cyril Arthur WILLIAMSON

Was the son of a school master. Served throughout the War, although from the middle of 1917 he was involved in training reserve units back in England. He went on to be a Company Director.

Related surnames: Clarke, Poole, Holder

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/cyril-arthur-williamson/

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Harold Vivian WOODFORD

At the outbreak of the War, he returned to England from Malaya, where he was working on Cicely Rubber Plantation. He went missing during the Battalion's second attack at Loos on 13th October 1915. His fate was not finally confirmed until his body was found on 26th December 1915.

Related surnames: Hodgson, Milner, Palmer, Rogers, Spencer, Beatty

See on new website: www.groupphoto.co.uk/background/harold-vivian-woodford/

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